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Wednesday 26 October 2016 Instagram
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BCA backs anti-size zero campaign

BCA backs anti-size zero campaign

Long-term damages of being too thin for your own skin

With London Fashion Week just around the corner (12–16 February) the "size zero" debate continues to rage, and the British Chiropractic Association (BCA) is urging those tempted to shed the pounds to consider the long-term damage of being too thin for your own skin.

Possibly the most extreme celebrity diet to date, "size zero" has 
already caused controversy and uproar from across the pond and it looks as if it is set to continue in Britain as more and more young girls aspire to look like human lollipops as demonstrated by the likes of Nicole Richie and Victoria Beckham.

For these the thought of having a waist smaller than 23 inches is a goal, but the British Chiropractic Association is urging these impressionable girls to wake up to the realities and to see the extent of the long-term damage caused by extreme skinniness.

Rishi Loatey from the British Chiropractic Association explains:  "About 40–50% of a female's body weight is made up of muscle; therefore going on these extreme diets not only causes you to lose frightening amounts of weight, but in doing so you are also losing significant amounts of muscle."

He continues: "Losing muscle mass means the support in vital areas such as the neck may not be enough to hold heavier structures like the head. This can potentially result in changes to posture such as forcing you to hold your head forward which causes the head to feel heavier, putting extra strain on the neck muscles, this can be linked to a number of long-term problems, such as headaches. In extreme cases significant weight loss can lead to loss of bone density (osteoporosis) and can cause changes to the menstrual cycle as well."

So as the models take to the catwalks next week it won't just be their hair and make-up they should be worrying about but the seriousness of what their low weight is doing to them.

For more information visit or call the BCA on 0118 950 5950.

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