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Eating almonds helps support healthy fat levels

Eating almonds helps support healthy fat levels

The Almond Board of California funded its most recent study to investigate heart health risk factors, namely high triglyceride levels.

During the study, human subjects consumed muffin products made with pieces of whole almonds, compared to those made with oil. Researchers witnessed a delayed release of fats from the almonds into the body, which resulted in a lower rise in triglyceride levels.   
 
"This new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, expands upon previous cardiovascular research by investigating not only how the plant cell wall may impact how fats are absorbed into the body, but also the potential impact on acute changes in triglyceride levels," noted Dr. Sarah Berry, Nutritional Sciences Division, Kings College London.

"The data suggest that an intact plant cell wall, as found in whole almonds, may impact on how much and how quickly fat is released into the blood, contributing to a lower acute rise in blood triglyceride levels."
 
Researchers at King's College in London discovered that the increase in plasma triglycerides levels was lower after eating a meal that included muffins made with pieces of whole almonds than muffins made with oil-based fat sources, like almond oil and sunflower oil.
 
The Almond Board of California maintains that simple changes in one's diet can help overcome dietary challenges, especially during the holiday season.

One way to improve heart health is to make dietary choices that reduce triglyceride levels, an established risk factor for developing heart disease.
 
This study complements the nine clinical studies on almonds already in existence, demonstrating how almonds, as part of a diet low in saturated fat, can help maintain healthy cholesterol levels.

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

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