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Kids with pets grow up to be snorers

Kids with pets grow up to be snorers

A predisposition to adult snoring can be established very early in life. Research published in Respiratory Research describes possible childhood risk factors, including exposure to animals, early respiratory or ear infections and growing up in a large family.

Being hospitalised for a respiratory infection before the age of two years, suffering from recurrent ear infections as a child, growing up in a large family and being exposed to a dog at home as a newborn were all independently related to snoring in later life. The authors speculate "These factors may enhance inflammatory processes and thereby alter upper airway anatomy early in life, causing an increased susceptibility for adult snoring."

As well as the obvious problem of sleep deprivation for snorers and those unfortunate enough to share a room with them, research has also shown that people who snore also run more serious risks. The author said: "People who snore run an increased risk of early death and cardiovascular diseases, such as heart attacks or strokes.

"These new findings suggest that further knowledge about the early life environment may contribute to the primary prevention of snoring."

Respiratory Research

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