This site is intended for health professionals only
Sunday 25 September 2016 Instagram
Share |

Less than half of diabetes patients achieve target blood glucose levels

Less than half of diabetes patients achieve target blood glucose levels

New worldwide research indicates that less than 50% of type 2 diabetes patients are achieving target long-term blood glucose measures (HbA1c), and 40% of patients are experiencing diabetes complications. 

These results are being announced in support of World Diabetes Day (WDD), an annual campaign run by the International Diabetes Federation. WDD also heralds the beginning of a national search to find "The Face of Diabetes".

The Diabetes Impact Survey commissioned by Merck & Co., Inc., known in many countries as Merck Sharp & Dohme, was developed with a steering panel of world-renowned medical, scientific and clinical professionals in the field of diabetes. Key findings include:

  • According to the healthcare professionals surveyed, less than 50% of their patients are achieving their target HbA1c goal, a measure of long-term blood glucose control.
  • A survey of patients indicated that 40% reported complications associated with their disease.

National search for "The Face of Diabetes"
People with diabetes are being asked to send photographs or images of themselves, or what diabetes means to them, which will be used as a building block to form a mosaic of "The Face of Diabetes". Boxes will be placed in a selection of GP surgeries throughout the UK around World Diabetes Day (14 November) for pictures to be posted alongside any personal thoughts they have on living with diabetes.

Images and comments can also be emailed, sent by text or uploaded to the following link: www.facingdiabetes.co.uk
 
In the last year alone, the UK prevalence of diabetes has significantly increased with over 50,000 newly diagnosed cases. Diabetes now affects over 2,500,000 people in the UK. The long-term consequences of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes are significant. People with type 2 diabetes are more than twice as likely to die prematurely as those without the condition, and one in ten patients has been hospitalised because of their diabetes in the last 12 months.

Marc Evans, Consultant Diabetologist, Llandlough Hospital, comments, “Diabetes is set to increase. It is predicted that diabetes prevalence will double world-wide, rising to at least 5% by 2010, accounting for 3.07 million people in the UK. Having type 2 diabetes doubles your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. More needs to be done to raise the profile of what it means to have diabetes".

Facing Diabetes

Ads by Google

You are leaving www.nursinginpractice.com

You are currently leaving the Nursing in Practice site. Are you sure you want to proceed?