This site is intended for health professionals only
Tuesday 27 September 2016 Instagram
Share |

Research highlights mental-health fears

Research highlights mental-health fears

The chances of being killed by a schizophrenic stranger are just one in 14 million, research has revealed.

Scientists brought together studies from four different countries in the research, finding that murders committed by sufferers of the mental illness are "exceptionally rare".

The report, which used data from Finland, Australia, the Netherlands and Canada, added that fears about being killed by a stranger are "completely misplaced."

Australian psychiatrists from the University of New South Wales in Sydney compared the characteristics of 42 patients who had killed strangers with a matched sample who killed family members.

Stranger-killers were more likely to be homeless and to have a history of antisocial behaviour. Those killed were more likely to be male and the homicides rarely occurred in a victim's home or workplace.

More than half the perpetrators in both groups had never received treatment for schizophrenia. The findings were published in the journal Schizophrenia Bulletin.

Copyright © Press Association 2009

Scizophrenia Bulletin

Your comments (terms and conditions apply):

"This is not a reality. Data, influenced by well-meaning and loving relatives of the mentally ill, have skewed the statistics. Quoting from your own print: 'Stranger-killers were more likely to be homeless and to have a history of antisocial behaviour. Those killed were more likely to be male and the homicides rarely occurred in a victim's home or workplace.' This statement shows a lot of misunderstanding about the homeless. I know firsthand. I sought to find my daughter for eight years. She was with many homeless people and I went to many such places. It was obvious that those people had mental disorders. Police clamed not to be qualified to diagnose but off the record they admitted it was obvious. The statement, 'More than half the perpetrators in both groups had never received treatment for schizophrenia' is not valid for supporting the idea that 'scientists brought together studies from four different countries in the research, finding that murders committed by sufferers of the mental illness are 'exceptionally rare''. The 'Australian psychiatrists from the University of New South Wales in Sydney' need to check the data the world Health Organization has gathered in 16 different countries" – Tom I Jr, KY, USA

Ads by Google

You are leaving www.nursinginpractice.com

You are currently leaving the Nursing in Practice site. Are you sure you want to proceed?