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Thursday 27 October 2016 Instagram
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UK sandwiches saltier than crisps

UK sandwiches saltier than crisps


One shop-bought sandwich could contain more salt than seven packets of crisps, research shows.

Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH) studied 140 sandwiches available in UK shops and revealed that many contain more than a third of the day's recommended maximum salt serving.

That equates to 41% more salt than a Big Mac from McDonalds.

Another 11 sandwiches, almost 8% of the entire survey, contain half an adult's daily serving of salt.

The saltiest sandwich, filled with Yorkshire ham and wensleydale cheese, could be found on ASDA shelves, with 3.9g salt.

Following close behind was the Pret a Manger All Day Breakfast sandwich, with 3.54 g of salt and Tesco's Finest All Day Breakfast sandwich, with 3.5g salt.

A standard bag of Walker's Ready Salted crisps only contains 0.5g salt.

"We have calculated that the UK population consumes around 3,000 tonnes of salt each year, just from packaged sandwiches," says Carrie Bolt, CASH project assistant.

"Many of us buy a sandwich for lunch most days of the week, but we need to know how much salt is in those sandwiches."

She adds that some sandwich outlets do not provide nutrition labels, saying: "If someone chooses a lower salt option, they could save themselves at least 5g of salt a week – that's 250g salt a year!"

Consensus Action on Salt and Health

Your comments: (Terms and conditions apply)

"A low in salt diet is totally inappropriate for a healthy person, and may cause problems, particularly for the nervous system. With healthy kidneys too much salt is quickly removed and causes no significant issues, except perhaps a dubious connection to bladder cancer.  Only people with kidney problems or high-blood pressure need worry about salt. But salt is not the cause of chronic blood-pressure, and studies show only a marginal increase in pressure for a short time. That increase could be lethal in the case of very high, chronic blood-pressure patient. The official salt advice stems from the fact that many such people do not know they have this problem. For the rest of us it is a useless and potentially dangerous strategy" -  Greg Lorriman

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