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Belief flu jabs work leads more nurses to get vaccinated

Believing the flu jab works is “far more likely” to sway healthcare professionals to get vaccinated than their duty to protect patients at risk of infection, research suggests.

A study, published in the Occupational and Environmental Medicine, found doctors were “more willing” to get vaccinated against the flu virus than nurses.

Researchers studied the factors influencing just under 85,000 healthcare workers in hospitals in North America, Europe, and Australia in getting the jab.

The “most significant persuasive factors” in getting vaccinated were a belief the vaccine really works; a willingness to prevent the spread of the flu virus; and having a family that is usually vaccinated.

Such factors were all associated with a “greater than twofold increase” in flu jab uptake - a similar effect seen when healthcare workers have convenient access to vaccination.

On the opposite end of the scale, a willingness to protect either themselves or patients at risk of complications if infected registered as having “little influence” on whether to have the seasonal flu jab.

“Influenza vaccination will only be successful in [healthcare workers] if they are properly educated and if the vaccine is easily accessible,” said the researchers.

“Influenza vaccination will only be successful in [healthcare workers] if they are properly educated and if the vaccine is easily accessible,” said the researchers.

Questions: Which do you believe are the most persuasive factors for nurses to get the flu jab?