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Nurse killed in London Bridge terror attack honoured with Queen’s bravery award



Kirsty Boden, the nurse who was killed as she tried to help victims during the London Bridge terrorist attack last year, has been posthumously awarded the Queen’s Commendation for Bravery.

The 28-year-old worked as a surgical recovery nurse at Guy’s and St Thomas’ hospital. Originally from Loxton in southern Australia. she moved to London in 2013 to work for the NHS.

Ms Boden is among eight people recognised in one of the largest number of civilian gallantry awards given for a single event since the Second World War.

Two police officers who confronted the attackers during the attack were also awarded the George Medal, for ‘gallantry of an extremely high order’.

British Transport Police officer Wayne Marques, 39, was left badly injured after fighting off all three terrorists armed with only his baton, while Metropolitan Police officer Charles Guenigault – who was off-duty at the time – was stabbed after rushing to his aid.

Eight people were killed and more than 40 were injured when Khuram Butt, Rachid Redouane and Youssef Zaghba attacked crowds of Londoners and tourists on 3 June last year.

In a statement at the time, Ms Boden’s family said: ‘As she ran towards danger, in an effort to help people on the bridge, Kirsty sadly lost her life.

‘We are so proud of Kirsty’s brave actions, which demonstrate how selfless, caring and heroic she was, not only on that night, but throughout all of her life.’

Dame Eileen Sills, chief nurse at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, said: ‘Kirsty was an outstanding nurse and a hugely valued member of the staff team in Theatres Recovery, described by her colleagues as “one in a million” who always went the extra mile for the patients in her care.’