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Thursday 29 September 2016 Instagram
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Cleaners urged to get superbug training

Cleaners urged to get superbug training

A recent survey carried out by Econo-Med at the Newcastle and Cardiff Nursing in Practice 2008 Events found that more than 90% of medical professionals thought that cleaners could benefit from more training on cross-contamination.
 
Andrew Large, Director General of the Cleaning Support Services Association (CSSA) comments: "All NHS trusts need to recognise the value that cleaning plays in fighting healthcare associated infections. The NHS should provide necessary funds and time to enable appropriate training for cleaning staff."
 
The survey also revealed that 75% of medical staff felt that there is not enough patient awareness on the dangers caused by superbugs and 11% of medical staff confessed they had not received cross-contamination training.
 
Derek Butler Chairman of MRSA Action UK remarks: "It is down to our government to raise the public's awareness of the dangers caused by superbugs. They should follow Ireland's example by running a national advertising campaign which highlights the hazards caused by healthcare-associated infections. Combatting cross-infection and superbugs is an all or nothing issue. There is no place for people or organisations to sit on the fence."
 
Econo-Med

Do you think cleaners could benefit from more training on cross-contamination? Your comments: (Terms and conditions apply)

"I believe cleaners and nursing staff could benefit from more training on cross-contamination. Cleaning is a science when it comes to keeping the care environment safe from harmful bacteria. So often spillages and other contamination is left in wards until the cleaner next comes onto their shift. Safe methods of cleaning should be taught to everyone who works on the ward, not just the cleaners. More training on aseptic non-touch technique is needed for nursing staff - its an art that has been forgotten and causes many of the infections we see from catheters and cannulas." - Maria Cann, Kirkham, Lancashire

 

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