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Monday 26 September 2016 Instagram
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Type 2 "moves quicker in children"

Type 2 "moves quicker in children"

Type 2 diabetes develops much quicker in children than it does in adults, according to a US study.

Research shows that insulin doses for children need to be raised within two years of the disease being diagnosed, indicating a faster beta-cell function decline than seen in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Lorraine Katz, who led the study at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, said such a rapid decline in glycaemic control had been unproven until now, although the findings were not unexpected.

She pointed out that "the decline in reserve over time in childhood type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) would be more severe for those presenting with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)".

Dr Katz added: "The more rapid deterioration of glucose control in children with type 2 diabetes is unsettling because of the myriad potential diabetic complications that may develop earlier than is seen in adults."

Copyright © Press Association 2010

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